allismyells:

shout out to all the:

  • physically disabled and chronically ill autistics
  • mentally ill autistics
  • autistic people of colour
  • trans and nonbinary autistics
  • queer autistics

(✿◠‿◠) ♥ you are important and beautiful and so very loved. 

1,139 notes

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Is she Kenyan or Mexican? That’s the question fuelling an international tug-of-war over Lupita Nyong’o’s success of late.

The 31-year-old has had an incredible year, from nabbing her first Oscar to murdering the fashion game with her stunning red carpet moves and becoming a celebrated champion of black women worldwide:

America loves her, BuzzFeed really loves her, almost everyone besides haterade-guzzling Nigerian singer Dencia loves her. And most recently, People magazineloved her a whole lot by naming her their “Most Beautiful person” of 2014:

image

Image Credit: AP

Put simply, the world is hopping on Lupita’s bandwagon, and that’s probablya good thing. But like Biggie said, “mo’ money, mo’ problems,” and success is not without its consequences.

A unique dilemma has arisen for the actress. María Ximena Plaza explores it in afascinating piece for Africa Is a Country titled “Lupita Nyong’o and the Mexicans,” which draws from various observations to address a deceptively simple question: Whom does Lupita’s success “belong” to?

This topic requires some explanation. Nyong’o is a global citizen, having been born in Mexico City, raised in Kenya, flown back to Mexico to learn Spanish as a teenager then enrolled in university and grad school in the U.S. According to Plaza, the actress identifies as “Mexi-Kenyan.”

But things got a bit complicated the day of the 2014 Oscars, when a reporter asked Nyong’o, “How much does the Oscar belong to Mexico?” The actress humorously replied, “It all belongs to me,” and gracefully changed the subject. But it was too late — the stage was set for a surprisingly involved exchange of “Kenya versus Mexico” claim staking and collective butt-hurtness.

How it went down: Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta drew first blood, affirming his nation’s entitlement to Nyong’o before she even won. “I join millions of Kenyans and worldwide fans to congratulate and support Lupita Nyong’o as she confronts one of the biggest nights in her career so far,” he wrote in a statement.

Kisumu county Governor Jack Ranguma added: “This is a win for Kenya and for Africa as well.”

Following her victory, both Kenyatta and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto tweeted their pride-filled congratulations:

Image Credit: SDP Noticias

News reports in both countries highlighted her as "a symbol of national pride." Neither acknowledged the other as a possible site for her allegiance.

Yet according to Plaza, some Mexican outlets also took umbrage with what they saw as Nyongo’s’ refusal to “share” her award with her birth country: “After winning the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress, Lupita Nyong’o, who earlier reportedly had expressed her pride of being Mexican-born, chose to not share this recognition with the Mexicans,” wrote SDP Noticias.

Commenters agreed with these sentiments, even going so far as to claim Nyong’o “bought a misguided view of Mexico as racist to blacks or people of African descent.”

And that’s when shit got real: “It is curious that a country deeply racist such as Mexico claims Lupita’s award,” tweeted Mexican blogger and journalist Alberto Buitre.

Shots fired. Blogger Victor Hernández added: “[What] does she owe to Mexico? Nothing. Come On. Televisa (the Mexican private channel) would never have given her a leading role in a soap opera. In the racist Mexican television industry those roles are reserved to white actresses or blondes.”

Thus began a quickly escalating debate about racism in Mexican society. This topic has been discussed extensively in the past, with special emphasis on the skin-color divide between wealthier Mexicans, whose lighter “complexion betrays an allegiance to the Spanish who conquered the Aztec empire,” and the darker-skinned who overwhelmingly constitute the "peasantry and working classes."

It’s a taboo subject of discussion, claims CNN contributor Ruben Navarrete, yet one that “hides in plain view.”

"It’s no exaggeration," Navarrete writes, "to say that … the best, highest-paying, most important jobs often seem to go to those who, in addition to having the best education and the strongest connections, have the lightest skin."

image

Image Credit: Getty

Oh, the irony. How interesting that a country with such a deeply ingrained tradition of racism now has politicians and media outlets staking claims to a dark-skinned black actress. Of course, this is not to say it wouldn’t happen the same way everywhere else. The practice of exceptionalizing “successful” or “palatable” minorities in racially unequal nations — like the United States, for instance — is hardly uncommon.

But call it hypocrisy, political convenience or a genuine attempt to incorporate blacks into a more inclusive definition of Mexican identity, whatever it is, it fails to address the real problem: Lupita’s success is no more than a surface triumph if the country’s institutional racism remains unaltered.

Nyong’o is an entertainer, so this goes doubly true for Mexican media. Jerry Ph puts it best in TV Notas: “Now Televisa will hire her for one of its shows?” he asks. “Her role would probably be as a maid or a nanny of a blond rich. Though it hurts, this is the truth.”

There’s clearly a lot of work to be done on this front. The under-representation and devaluation of dark-skinned actresses is a problem almost everywhere, so once more, this is not unique to Mexico. But if Mexican politicians and media are putting this much emphasis on claiming Nyong’o as their own, one would hope they’re putting just as much effort into expanding their modes of representation to incorporate more dark-skinned women.

The obvious should go without saying, but no matter what, this victory belongs to Nyong’o and whomever she chooses to share it with. “I’m Kenyan and Mexican at the same time,” she says. End of story.

Source: Zak Cheney Rice for Policy Mic

25 notes

lexliftlove:

adr0itness:

optimus-primette:

prideandpeaches:

lame—lane:

kimberleanneeee:

alxbngala:

Meal Time for Baby Squirrel []

OH MY GOD.

OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH MY GODDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

LOOK AT HIS MILL BELLY OR HERS WHATEVER IM NOT A SQUIRREL EXPERT

Agh. I had a baby squirrel once. And he got fed like this for a bit :”)

DEY WIPE ITS WITTLE FACE!

11,281 notes

tensioned:

there should be an award for the people who

  • finish a whole tube of chap stick without losing it
  • finish the shampoo and conditioner at the same time

(Source: tensioned)

44,818 notes

dynamicafrica:

Adama Paris Fall 2014 Lookbook.

Tartan patterns inspired by the infamous “Ghana-Must-Go” bags takes center stage in Senegalese designer Adama Amanda Ndiaye’s lookbook for her Fall 2014 collection.

230 notes

youarenotyou:

fuckyeahwomenprotesting:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly


“Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” - Kevin Spak, Newser


"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly


Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. - Leanne Aguilera, E! Online


"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It


The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress


So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly


"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon


"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic


"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint


"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes


"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times


In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times


The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky


His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.


It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club


If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate


This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired


"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine


I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon


"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine


"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week


The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com


Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire


Why I stopped watching Game of thrones. This is not the first time the tv show actually removed consent from sex. It’s not just showing the sexual assault in the book it’s creating it for drama.

this is so much worse knowing they don’t even consider it a rape scene what the FUCK
i feel sick

youarenotyou:

fuckyeahwomenprotesting:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly

Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” Kevin Spak, Newser

"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly

Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. Leanne Aguilera, E! Online

"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It

The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress

So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly

"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon

"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic

"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint

"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes

"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times

In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times

The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky

His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.

It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club

If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate

This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired

"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine

I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon

"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine

"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week

The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com

Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire

Why I stopped watching Game of thrones. This is not the first time the tv show actually removed consent from sex. It’s not just showing the sexual assault in the book it’s creating it for drama.

this is so much worse knowing they don’t even consider it a rape scene what the FUCK

i feel sick

18,555 notes